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Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Gadfly Radio with Martha and CalWatchDog: Tonight, Ben Boychuk, John Seiler, with Special guest, Chris Reed, Journalist, Political Pundit, Honorary Gadfly!

Gadfly Radio Tonight, at 8 PM PT

Live Call in number: 1-818-602-4929
Jan 10, 2012:  Tonight live at 8 p.m. PT on Gadfly Radio, Martha Montelongo along with Ben Boychuk of CA City Journal and John Seiler of CalWatchDog.com.  Chris Reed, author, blogger, pundit at CalWhine.com joins us to talk about CA's budget, the $9 Billion Dollar Choo-choo train Jerry wants even though, as Dan Walter's writes, we're buried under a mountain of debt.  

We'll talk with Chris about his latest posts at CalWhine.com, in addition to his most recent on the Bullet Train, and the impact on the people of California. He opines on Education, on Public Employee Pensions and Benefits, on junk science driving public policy in CA, via AB32, and more.

Steven Greenhut has a piece out now at California City Journal, Crony Capitalism Rebuked California’s supreme court strikes a blow for property rights and fiscal sanity. He concludes by stating that Redevelopment agencies are fighting now, to bring back Redevelopment, and he poses a poignant question to the minority party in CA: Will Republicans side with property rights and limited government at the local level, or again stand up for these misguided and destructive bureaucratic bodies?

On Education, we'll talk with Chris Reed, John Seiler and Ben Boychuk about Larry Sand's op-ed about "air time," a little known scheme in California and 20 other states that allows teachers and other public employees to pad their pensions at taxpayers’ expense. We didn't get to it last week.

Sand has an new piece out today also at UnionWatch.org, called More Pension Truths and Why You Should be Very Angry, which we may or may not get to on the program, but which you ought to know about.

We'll take your calls, questions and comments on the air at 1-818-602-4929 on on FB instant chat or Twitter.

 

I am a stand for liberty, integrity, empowerment, and prosperity for all people; a stand for vibrant and innovative small businesses that create jobs, that in the process of prospering, nurture and support creative and dynamic culture, in the work place, and in our personal lives.



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CalWatchDog's team of government policy watch dogs and the great investigative work they produce! 

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Botched Paramilitary Police Raids: An Epidemic of "Isolated Incidents"

"If a widespread pattern of [knock-and-announce] violations were shown . . . there would be reason for grave concern." —Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, in Hudson v. Michigan, June 15, 2006. An interactive map of botched SWAT and paramilitary police raids, released in conjunction with the Cato policy paper "Overkill: The Rise of Paramilitary Police Raids," by Radley Balko. What does this map mean? How to use this map View Original Map and Database

Key

Death of an innocent. Death or injury of a police officer. Death of a nonviolent offender.
Raid on an innocent suspect. Other examples of paramilitary police excess. Unnecessary raids on doctors and sick people.
The proliferation of SWAT teams, police militarization, and the Drug War have given rise to a dramatic increase in the number of "no-knock" or "quick-knock" raids on suspected drug offenders. Because these raids are often conducted based on tips from notoriously unreliable confidential informants, police sometimes conduct SWAT-style raids on the wrong home, or on the homes of nonviolent, misdemeanor drug users. Such highly-volatile, overly confrontational tactics are bad enough when no one is hurt -- it's difficult to imagine the terror an innocent suspect or family faces when a SWAT team mistakenly breaks down their door in the middle of the night. But even more disturbing are the number of times such "wrong door" raids unnecessarily lead to the injury or death of suspects, bystanders, and police officers. Defenders of SWAT teams and paramilitary tactics say such incidents are isolated and rare. The map above aims to refute that notion.

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