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Real public servants are free enterprising individuals who, inspired, embrace challenge, take risks, and create, sometimes big, and often, they create jobs in the process, all out of their ideas, and self initiative...

Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Dan Walters: California's 'wall of debt' is really a mountain -But he wants a bullet train that will top $9 Billion!!!!

Sacramento Politics - California Politics | Sacramento Bee

"...Brown's budget cites the $33 billion in on- and off-the-books debt run up in recent years to cover the state's operational shortfalls..."

"...But those numbers, as large as they may appear, are only the foothills of the debt mountain that state and local governments have amassed in recent years..."

"...California voters have approved nearly $130 billion in active general obligation bonds, of which $73 billion are still outstanding and $33 billion remain unissued, according to the state treasurer's office, and even if no more are sold, it will cost the state nearly $135 billion to repay them over the next 30 years..."

"...Other bond issues that lack dedicated revenues and therefore must be repaid from the state treasury will cost another $20 billion..."

There's also Redevelopment Debt: "...more than $100 billion in debt that must be repaid, mostly from property taxes that otherwise would finance local services. With interest, it may be $200 billion..."

Federal Govt loans to $10 billion dollars in loans from the Feds to CA for Unemployment Insurance.


Unfunded Public Employee Pension debt: According to Brown, "...$45.2 billion and retiree health care at $59.9 billion, but independent estimates of the pension gap have ranged as high as a half-trillion dollars, depending on assumption of future investment earnings..."

BUT HE WANTS the CHOO CHOO TRAIN THAT WILL SERVE PRIMARILY MIDDLE CLASS RIDERS WHO CAN FEEL "GOOD" ABOUT THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO SAVING THE ENVIRONMENT, AND WHO THINK IT'S COOL TO RIDE A SHINY TRAIN. Who cares if it's costs are now estimated to be more than $9 Billion Dollars. LET THE POOR EAT CAKE


Read more here: Dan Walters: California's 'wall of debt' is really a mountain - Sacramento Politics - California Politics | Sacramento Bee
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Botched Paramilitary Police Raids: An Epidemic of "Isolated Incidents"

"If a widespread pattern of [knock-and-announce] violations were shown . . . there would be reason for grave concern." —Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, in Hudson v. Michigan, June 15, 2006. An interactive map of botched SWAT and paramilitary police raids, released in conjunction with the Cato policy paper "Overkill: The Rise of Paramilitary Police Raids," by Radley Balko. What does this map mean? How to use this map View Original Map and Database

Key

Death of an innocent. Death or injury of a police officer. Death of a nonviolent offender.
Raid on an innocent suspect. Other examples of paramilitary police excess. Unnecessary raids on doctors and sick people.
The proliferation of SWAT teams, police militarization, and the Drug War have given rise to a dramatic increase in the number of "no-knock" or "quick-knock" raids on suspected drug offenders. Because these raids are often conducted based on tips from notoriously unreliable confidential informants, police sometimes conduct SWAT-style raids on the wrong home, or on the homes of nonviolent, misdemeanor drug users. Such highly-volatile, overly confrontational tactics are bad enough when no one is hurt -- it's difficult to imagine the terror an innocent suspect or family faces when a SWAT team mistakenly breaks down their door in the middle of the night. But even more disturbing are the number of times such "wrong door" raids unnecessarily lead to the injury or death of suspects, bystanders, and police officers. Defenders of SWAT teams and paramilitary tactics say such incidents are isolated and rare. The map above aims to refute that notion.

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