Ponder This:

Real public servants are free enterprising individuals who, inspired, embrace challenge, take risks, and create, sometimes big, and often, they create jobs in the process, all out of their ideas, and self initiative...

Friday, January 21, 2011

Guests this Saturday night are former Bracero turned Wine Maker Grower Reynaldo Robledo Sr. & Jacob Hornberger on Immigration, Prosperity and Liberty

Podcast Part 1 & Part 2
Saturday Nights at 11PM Pacific Time
You can listen live on line at KRLA870AM.com

To call us during the show: 1-866-870-5752

This Saturday night, January 22, 2011:

Sr. Reynaldo Robledo Sr. came to California from Mexico as a teenager and a Bracero, a guest worker, in 1968.  He discovered a passion for growing grapes, and learned how to grow them exceptionally well.  His story is a great American story. 

Today in addition to his thriving vineyard management business managing hundreds of acres and his family's own over three hundred acres, the Robledo Family also is a fine wine maker. 

His values are the values shared by all free spirited lovers of liberty and freedom, family and entrepreneurship. 

He believes in the possibility of individuals like him, who start with nothing, but given the opportunity, can rise to create wealth, fulfilling jobs, and beautiful products for edifying pleasure and celebration.

I am also delighted to welcome a new friend, Jacob Hornberger, President and founder of Future of Freedom Foundation FFF.org.   Love the name!   Mr. Hornberger is a native of Laredo Texas and he grew up in a bilingual bi-cultural community.  He notes in an essay "The city, whose street names include many Spanish and Mexican historical figures, has the biggest celebration in the nation honoring George Washington's birthday."  His example as does Reynaldo Robledo's, shatters the myth that multi-lingual, multi-cultural communities undermine American Exceptionalism!  In Spanish we would say ¡Eso! ¡Eso! in English, Here! Here!

The truth, the words of freedom and liberty ring true and are the same principles in any language. Like the Bible is the Word, in any language, the principles of Liberty are the principles of liberty in any language. If we speak them and practice them, we are united.

The Future of Freedom Foundation's mission statement rings true, loud and clear: The mission of The Future of Freedom Foundation is to advance freedom by providing an uncompromising moral and economic case for individual liberty, free markets, private property, and limited government.

The motivation for the people who make this radio program possible is our passion for liberty.  Our purpose is to inform, inspire, celebrate and advance integrity, creative endeavors and individual liberty.

We talk politics, business and culture, and feature ordinary individuals who accomplish extraordinary feats, who act and lead to help transform the future of California such that our best days lay ahead.

Make us your nightcap on Saturday nights in Southern California or where ever you are.  California is still a happening place, and this little engine, The Martha Montelongo Show is revved up to go! Join us.

Bookmark and Share
Post a Comment

Botched Paramilitary Police Raids: An Epidemic of "Isolated Incidents"

"If a widespread pattern of [knock-and-announce] violations were shown . . . there would be reason for grave concern." —Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, in Hudson v. Michigan, June 15, 2006. An interactive map of botched SWAT and paramilitary police raids, released in conjunction with the Cato policy paper "Overkill: The Rise of Paramilitary Police Raids," by Radley Balko. What does this map mean? How to use this map View Original Map and Database

Key

Death of an innocent. Death or injury of a police officer. Death of a nonviolent offender.
Raid on an innocent suspect. Other examples of paramilitary police excess. Unnecessary raids on doctors and sick people.
The proliferation of SWAT teams, police militarization, and the Drug War have given rise to a dramatic increase in the number of "no-knock" or "quick-knock" raids on suspected drug offenders. Because these raids are often conducted based on tips from notoriously unreliable confidential informants, police sometimes conduct SWAT-style raids on the wrong home, or on the homes of nonviolent, misdemeanor drug users. Such highly-volatile, overly confrontational tactics are bad enough when no one is hurt -- it's difficult to imagine the terror an innocent suspect or family faces when a SWAT team mistakenly breaks down their door in the middle of the night. But even more disturbing are the number of times such "wrong door" raids unnecessarily lead to the injury or death of suspects, bystanders, and police officers. Defenders of SWAT teams and paramilitary tactics say such incidents are isolated and rare. The map above aims to refute that notion.

Blog Archive